Wonderful World 🌍’Mysteries’ Part I

The Planet Earth is a strange place to live in as there are unexplainable theories and mysteries that are yet to be discovered. For our first ever ‘Wonderful World’ chapters, we will be identifying a set of random strange and unique things that the world has on offer as well as unusual man-made phenomenons.

♣ The Bermuda Triangle 

bermuda-triangle

It has been said that the Bermuda Triangle is a strange area in which many ships and planes have disappeared for no apparent reason. This region lies between Bermuda, Miami and in San Juan, Puerto Rico as shown on the map below.

bermuda-triangle-1

There has been stories about the Bermuda Triangle that made people believe that there is something very strange about that area for example, Flight 19, a classification of 5 US torpedo bombers vanished in the same location in 1945. Also, in 1872, the Mary Celeste ‘The Ghost Ship‘ disappeared in the triangle leaving no trace. Altogher, there has been at least 75 aircrafts along with hundreds of ships reported missing in the Bermuda Triangle.

There are theories that explain the possible causes, such as paranormal, electromagnetic interference (that creates compass problems) and bad weather. Also, it could be because of the gulf stream (a warm ocean) and large underwater fields of methane. Nevertheless, there are new theories that contradict the old theories, the latest one being that the reason for these disasters has to be because of hexagonal clouds according to scientists (mirror.co.uk).

 

♣ The Giant Sable Antelope 

(A Palanca Negra Gigante)

palanca_negra_gigante

The Giant Sable Antelope can only be found in Angola between the regions Cuango and Luando rivers. These sable subspecies are very rare, even in their native country. Their physical appearance can be described as very large animals with long and thick curved horns which are used as defence against natural predators and in dominance fights.

Habitat: They live in tall grass and wooded savanna near water sources. They also prefer to reside where trees shoots and where juicy plants and leaves are abundant.

Diet: Giant Sable Antelopes are herbivores and eat medium length grass moreover, 90% of their diet consists of tree leaves. They have a ruminant digestive system.

The Giant Sable Antelope has survived the long civil war in Angola and are now a critically endangered species with only around 1,000 of them that are still alive and are protected in nature parks where hunting is forbidden.

 

♣ The Moai Statues

AhuTongariki.JPG

If you have heard of the Moai statues in the Easter Island (Rapa Nui), you will know that these were built in approximately 1400 to 1650 A.D. by the natives using only carving tools like the famous toki (handheld chisels). These statues represented important people who had passed away in that era.

There has been many theories regarding the Moai statues and the Easter Island. Some of these theories include:

  1. The statues may have had bodies.
  2. The island’s ecosystems were wrecked because the natives thought that by chopping down trees, clearing fields and making fires would make the vegetation grow quicker.
  3. The loss of the trees meant that the island was more exposed to the volcanic soils which caused serious erosion.
  4. How did these statues move? For more information regarding the Moai statues, visit National Geographic website.

 

♣ Hashima Island 

2712681

Lastly, we have the Hashima Island ‘Japan’s Ghost Island’. This island was once populated by at least 5,000 people in 1959. In 1887, Hashima was known for its undersea coal mines  during the industrialisation of Japan. Many people would reside there to work in the coal industry. However, when the coal reserves were nearly depleting, the mine was closed and all the residents abandoned the island as there were no more jobs left to support their families. After three decades, there was an interest in the island again. This eventually became a tourist attraction because of its historic ruins. It is now a UNESCO World Heritage site as it is protected because of its industrial heritage.

I would definitely would want to visit Hashima Island one day!

 

Hint: For a visual look of the Island please click here.

 

“We live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures that we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open.”

– Jawaharlal Nehru

Don’t forget to follow and leave a comment of your favourite wonder. Stay tuned for more Wonderful World next Thursday. 🙂

XOXO Anita

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